0 Comment

English

You are here:
< Back

Read Write Inc is a synthetic phonics programme that ensures reading, writing and spelling success.

The presentation below gives you an overview of Read Write Inc at St Thomas Halliwell and the videos are external videos explaining, modelling and endorsing the programme.

Read Write Inc Presentation for Parents.

Click Here! to go to the parents section​ of the Read Write Inc website.


Junior Librarian

Review – Circulate – Enquiry


 

Recommended Reads for Year Groups

Recommended Reads List for Year Groups

Get Reading, Keep Reading, Change Everything

 

 

We are a “Get Reading. Keep reading. Change Everything.” school.

We use the highly successful Read Write Inc. Phonics programme to teach our children to read, write and spell. Once fluent readers, our children move onto the Read Write Inc. Literacy and Language programme, inspiring a lifelong passion for reading, writing and speaking. Both programmes are fully matched to the new National Curriculum and give your child the best chance of success in the national tests.

Ruth Miskin Training recognise us for teaching the Read Write Inc. programmes with fidelity and passion – we know what it takes to make literacy pleasurable and rewarding for our children.

This badge says that in 2014 – 2015 we:

Raise standards in reading and writing for our childrenAre all expertly trained by Ruth Miskin Training – including our headteacher Miss WrightGain the latest programme updates through regular visits from our Ruth Miskin trainerRelease our literacy coordinators to ensure our high standards are maintained.

To visit the parent pages on the Ruth Miskin Training website go to: http://www.ruthmiskin.com/en/parents/

Or visit their Facebook page, written for parents: https://www.facebook.com/miskin.education

To sign up to the Ruth Miskin Training newsletter go to: http://www.ruthmiskin.com/en/newsletter-subscribe/

Sentence Structures

Grammar

WordRegular plural noun suffixes –s or –es, (e.g: dog, dogs; wish, wishes), including the effects of these suffixes on the meaning of the noun

Suffixes that can be added to verbs where no change is needed in the spelling of root words (e.g: helping, helped, helper)

How the prefix un- changes the meaning of verbs and adjectives (negation, for example: unkind or undoing; untie the boat)

SentenceHow words can combine to make sentences

Joining words and joining clauses using and

TextSequencing sentences to form short narratives
PunctuationSeparation of words with spaces

Introduction to capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Capital letters for names and for the personal pronoun ‘I’

Terminology for pupilsLetter, capital letter, word, singular, plural, sentence, punctuation, full stop, question mark, exclamation mark
WordFormation of nouns using suffixes such as -ness, -er and by compounding (e.g: whiteboard, superman)

Formation of adjectives using suffixes such as -ful, -less

Use of the suffixes -er, -est in adjectives and the use of -ly in Standard English to turn adjectives into adverbs

SentenceSubordination (using when, if, that, because) and co-ordination (using or, and, but)

Expanded noun phrases for description and specification (e.g: the blue butterfly, plain flour, the man in the moon)

How the grammatical patterns in a sentence indicate its function as a statement, question, exclamation or command

TextCorrect choice and consistent use of present tense and past tense throughout writing

Use of the progressive form of verbs in the present and past tense to mark actions in progress (e.g: she is drumming, he was shouting)

PunctuationUse of capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences

Commas to separate items in a list

Apostrophes to mark where letters are missing in spelling and to mark singular possession in nouns (e.g: the girl’s name)

Terminology for pupilsNoun, noun phrase, statement, question, exclamation, command, compound, adjective, verb, suffix, adverb, tense (past, present) apostrophe, comma
WordFormation of nouns using a range of prefixes (e.g: super-, anti- auto-)

Use of the forms or an according to whether the next word begins with a consonant or a vowel (e.g: a rock, an open box)

Word families based on common words, showing how words are related in form and meaning (e.g: solve, solution, solver, dissolve, insoluble)

SentenceExpressing time, place and cause using conjunctions (e.g: when, before, after, while, so, because), adverbs (e.g: then, next, soon, therefore), or prepositions (e.g: before, after, during, in, because of)
TextIntroduction to paragraphs as a way to group related material

Headings and sub-headings to aid presentation

Use of the present perfect form of verbs instead of the simple past (for example, He has gone out to play contrasted with He went out to play)

PunctuationIntroduction to inverted commas to punctuate direct speech
Terminology for pupilsAdverb, preposition, conjunction, word family, prefix, clause, subordinate clause, direct speech, consonant, consonant letter, vowel, vowel letter, inverted commas (or ‘speech marks’)
WordThe grammatical difference between plural and possessive -s

Standard English forms for verb inflections instead of local spoken forms (e.g: we were instead of we was,  or I did instead of I done)

SentenceNoun phrases expanded by the addition of modifying adjectives, nouns and preposition phrases (e.g. the teacher expanded to: the strict maths teacher with curly hair)

Fronted adverbials (e.g. Later that day, I heard the bad news.)

TextUse of paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme

Appropriate choice of pronoun or noun within and across sentences to aid cohesion and avoid repetition

PunctuationUse of inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate direct speech (e.g: a comma after the reporting clause; end punctuation within inverted commas: The conductor shouted, “Sit down!”)

Apostrophes to mark plural possession (e.g: the girl’s name, the girls’ names)

Use of commas after fronted adverbials

Terminology for pupilsDeterminer, pronoun, possessive pronoun, adverbial
WordConverting nouns or adjectives into verbs using suffixes (e.g: -ate;   -ise; -ify)

Verb prefixes (e.g: dis-, de-, mis-, over- and re-)

SentenceRelative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that, or an omitted relative pronoun

Indicating degrees of possibility using adverbs (e.g: perhaps, surely) or modal verbs (e.g: might, should, will, must)

TextDevices to build cohesion within a paragraph (e.g: then, after that, this, firstly)

Linking ideas across paragraphs using adverbials of time (e.g. later), place (e.g. nearby) and number (e.g. secondly) or tense choices (e.g. he had seen her before)

PunctuationBrackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis

Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity

Terminology for pupilsModal verb, relative pronoun, relative clause, parenthesis, bracket, dash, cohesion, ambiguity
WordThe difference between vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing (e.g: find out – discover; ask for – request; go in – enter)

How words are related by meaning as synonyms and antonyms (e.g: big, large, little)

SentenceUse of the passive to affect the presentation of the information in a sentence (e.g: I broke the window in the greenhouse – versus – The window in the greenhouse was broken (by me).

The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing (e.g: the use of question tags: He’s your friend, isn’t he? or the use of subjunctive forms such as If I were or Were they to come in some very formal writing and speech)

TextLinking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices: repetition of a word or phrase, grammatical connections (e.g: the use of adverbials such as: on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence), and ellipsis

Layout devices (e.g: headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets or tables, to structure text)

PunctuationUse of the semi-colon, colon and dash to mark the boundary between independent clauses (e.g. It’s raining; I’m fed up.)

Use of the colon to introduce a list and use of semi-colons within lists. Punctuation of bullet points to list information

How hyphens can be used to avoid ambiguity (e.g: man eating shark – versus – man-eating shark, or recover – versus – re-cover)

Terminology for pupilsSubject, object, active, passive, synonym, antonym, ellipsis, hyphen, colon, semi-colon, bullet points

Grammar Terminology

Nouns
TermDefinition
Nounnoun is a ‘naming’ word: a word used for naming an animal, a person, a place or a thing.
Proper nounThis is a noun used to name particular people and places: Jim, Betty, London… – and some ‘times’: Monday, April, Easter… It always begins with a capital letter.
Common nounA common noun is a noun that is used to name everyday things: cars, toothbrushes, trees,… – and kinds of people: man, woman, child 
Collective nounThis is a noun that describes a group or collection of people or things: army, bunch, team, swarm…
Abstract nounAn abstract noun describes things that cannot actually be seen, heard, smelt, felt or tasted: sleep, honesty, boredom, freedom, power …
 Adjectives
TermDefinition
AdjectiveAn adjective is a ‘describing’ word: it is a word used to describe (or tell you more about) a noun.

Example: The burglar was wearing a black jacket, a furry hat and a large mask over his face. (The words in bold tell us more about the noun that follows)

An adjective usually comes before a noun but sometimes it can be separated from its noun and come afterwards (e.g.: Ben looked frightened; the dog was very fierce)

Interrogative (‘asking’) adjectivese.g.: What? Which? … They are used to ask questions about a noun.

ExampleWhich hat do you prefer?

Possessive adjectivese.g.: my, our, their, his, your … Possessive adjectives show ownership.

Example.: Sue never brushes her hair

Adjectives of number or quantitye.g. much, more, most, little, some, any, enough … These answer the question: How much?

Example: She invited five friends for breakfast; she did not have any food left

Demonstrative (‘pointing-out’) adjectivee.g.: this, that, these, those… Demonstrative adjectives answer the question: Which?

Example: Those apples and these pears are bad; That man stole this handbag.

Verbs
TermDefinition
VerbA verb is a word, or a group of words, that tells you what a person or thing is being or doing. It is often called a ‘doing’ word: e.g. running, eating, sitting.

All sentences have a subject and a verb. The subject is the person or thing doing the action: Example: Cats purr (Cats is the subject and purr is the verb)

Auxiliary verbA verb is often made up of more than one word. The actual verb-word is helped out by parts of the special verbs: the verb to be and the verb to have.These ‘helping’ verbs are called auxiliary verbs and can help us to form tenses.

Auxiliary verbs for ‘to be’ include: am, are, is, was, were,

Auxiliary verbs for ‘to have’ include: have, had, hasn’t, has, will have, will not have.

Examples:

have arrived (‘arrived’ is the main verb and ‘have’ is the auxiliary verb)

We are waiting (‘waiting’ is the main verb and ‘are’ is the auxiliary verb)

Adverbs
TermDefinition
AdverbAn adverb tells you more about the verb (it ‘adds’ to the verb). It nearly always answers the questions: How? When? Where? or Why?

Most adverbs in English end in –ly and come from adjectives:

E.gsoft – softly; slow – slowly.

Adverb or Adjective?Some words can be either adverbs or adjectives depending on what they do in a sentence, e.g. fast, hard, late.

If they answer the questions: How? When? Where? or Why? – they are adverbs.

If they answer the question: “What is it like?” – they are adjectives, and will be telling you more about a specific noun.

Examples:

Life is hard. (adjective)                      Kim works hard. (adverb)

The train arrived early. (adverb)     I took an early train. (adjective)

Pronouns
TermDefinition
PronounSometimes you refer to a person or a thing not by its actual name, but by another word which stands for it. The word you use to stand for a noun is called a pronoun (which means ‘for a noun’)

We use pronouns so that we do not have to repeat the same nouns over again.

Have a look at the following sentence: When Barnaby stroked the cat and listened to the cat purring softly, Barnaby felt calm and peaceful.

Compare it with the same sentence where some of the nouns have been replaced by pronouns: When Barnaby stroked the cat and listened to itpurring softly, he felt calm and peaceful.

Singular pronounsSingular pronouns are used to refer to one person or thing.

E.g.: I, you, me, he, she, it, you, him, her, mine, yours, his, hers, its

Plural

 pronouns

Plural pronouns are used to refer to more than one person or thing.

E.g.: we, they, us, them, ours, yours, theirs

Other word classes and grammatical terms
TermDefinition
PrepositionsPrepositions are words which show the relationship of one thing to another.

Examples: Tom jumped over the cat.

The monkey is in the tree.

These words tell you where one thing is in relation to something else.

Other examples of prepositions include: up, across, into, past, under, below, above …

DetermineDeterminers include many of the most frequent English words, eg theamythis. Determiners are used with nouns (this book, my best friend, a new car) and they limit (ie determine) the reference of the noun in some way.

Determiners include:

articles a/anthe

demonstratives this/thatthese/those

possessives my/your/his/her/its/our/their

quantifiers someanynomanymuchfewlittlebothalleitherneithereacheveryenough

numbers threefiftythree thousand etc

some question words which (which car?), what (what size?), whose (whose coat?)

Connectives (conjunctions)Connectives (conjunctions) join together words, phrases, clauses and sentences. They help us to create compound sentences by joining two main clauses together.

E.g.: She went to the shopsShe bought a box of chocolates.

We can use a conjunction to join these sentences together:

She went to the shops and bought a box of chocolates.

Other connectives (conjunctions) include: but, as, so, or …

Subordinating connectivesSubordinating connectives link a main (independent) clause with a subordinate (dependent) clause (a clause which does not make sense on its own).

Example: When we got home, we were hungry.

We were hungry because we hadn’t eaten all day. Other subordinating connectives include: if, while, after, until, before , although…

ArticleAn article is always used with and gives some information about a noun. There are three articles: a, an and the

Examples: the chair; a table; an elephant

*There is sometimes confusion about whether to use a or an. The sound of a word’s first letter helps us to know which to use: If a word begins with a vowel sound, you should use an; if a word begins with a consonant sound, you should use a.

Features of sentences/Types of sentences
TermDefinition
Declarative sentence (statement)These are sentences which state facts.

e.g.: It is hot.

The butter is in the fridge.

Interrogative sentence (question)

 

Interrogative sentences (questions) are sentences which ask for an answer.

e.g.: Are you hot?

Where is the butter?

Imperative sentence (command)These are sentences which give orders or requests.

e.g.: Play the movie.

Give me a dinosaur for my birthday.

Exclamatory sentence (exclamation)

 

Exclamatory sentences (exclamations) are sentences which express a strong feeling of emotion.

e.g.: My goodness, it’s hot!

I absolutely love this movie!

 

 

 

 

Clause

A clause is a group of words which does contain a verb; it is part of a sentence.

There are two kinds of clauses:

  1. main clause (makes sense on its own) e.g.: Sue bought a new dress.
  2. subordinate clause (does not make sense on its own; it depends on the main clause for its meaning)

E.g.: Sue bought a new dress when she went shopping.

*‘when she went shopping’ is the subordinate clause as it would not make sense without the main clause.

 

Phrase

A phrase is a group of words which does not make complete sense on its own and does not contain a verb; it is not a complete sentence: e.g.: up the mountain

Vocabulary/language strategies

DefinitionExample
Synonyms

These are words that have a similar meaning to another word. We use synonyms to make our writing more interesting.

Synonyms for:

Bad – awful, terrible, horrible

Happy – content, joyful, pleased

Look – watch, stare, glaze

Walk – stroll, crawl, tread

Antonyms

These are words with the opposite meaning to another word.

The antonym of up is down

The antonym of tall is short

The antonym of add is subtract

Word groups/ families

These are groups of words that have a common feature or pattern – they have some of the same combinations of letters in them and a similar sound.

 

at, cat, hat, and fat are a family of words with the “at” sound and letter combination in common.

bike, hike, like, spike and strike are a family of words with the “ike” sound and letter combination in common.

blame, came, fame, flame and game are a family of words with the “ame” sound and letter combination in common.

Prefix

Prefixes are added to the beginning of an existing word in order to create a new word with a different meaning.

Adding ‘un’ to happy – unhappy

Adding ‘dis’ to appear – disappear

Adding ‘re’ to try – retry

Suffix

Suffixes are added to the end of an existing word to create a new word with a different meaning.

Adding ‘ish’ to child – childish

Adding ‘able’ to like – likeable

Adding ‘ion’ to act – action

Root words

Root words are words that have a meaning of their own but can be added to either with a prefix (before the root) or a suffix (after the root) to change the meaning of the word. Root words can often be helpful in finding out what a word means or where it is ‘derived’ from.

help is a root word

It can grow into:

helps

helpful

helped

helping

helpless

unhelpful

Singular

 

A singular noun names one person, place or thing (a single item).

One bike

One mango

One dress

One fly

One turkey

One half

Plural

More than one person, place or thing.

Most nouns are made into plurals by adding –s:

Three bikes

Some nouns ending in –o are made into plurals by adding –es:

Two mangoes

Most nouns ending in hissing, shushing or buzzing sounds are made into plurals by adding –es:

Ten dresses

For words ending in a vowel and then –y, just  add –s:

Eight turkeys

For words ending in a consonant and then –y, change -y to -i

and add –es: Five flies

Most nouns ending in -f or-fe change to -ves in the plural:

Six halves

DefinitionExample
Capital letter

Used to denote the beginning of a sentence or a proper noun (names of particular places, things and people).

Joel has karate training ever Monday afternoon at Wells Primary School.

IJanuary, the children will be visiting London Zoo.

Full stop

Placed at the end of a sentence that is not a question or statement.

Terry Pratchett’s latest book is not yet out in paperback. I asked her whether she could tell me the way to Brighton.
Question mark

Indicates a question/disbelief.

Who else will be there?

Is this really little Thomas?

Exclamation mark

Indicates an interjection/surprise/strong emotion

What a triumph!

I’ve just about had enough!

Wonderful!

Inverted commas

Punctuation marks used in pairs ( “ ”) to indicate:

  • quotes (evidence).
  • direct speech
  • words that are defined, that follow certain phrases or that have special meaning.
For direct speech:

Janet asked, “Why can’t we go today?”

For quotes: The man claimed that he was “shocked to hear the news”.

For words that are defined, that follow certain phrases or that have special meaning:

‘Buch’ is German for book. The book was signed ‘Terry Pratchett’. The ‘free gift’ actually cost us forty pounds.

Apostrophes

 

Used to show that letters have been left out (contractions) or to show possession (i.e. ‘belonging to’)

Contractions:

Is not = isn’t                  Could not = couldn’t

Showing Possession:

With nouns (plural and singular) not ending in an s add ‘s:  the girl’s jacket, the children’s books

With plural nouns ending in an s, add only the apostrophe: the guards’ duties, the Jones’ house

With singular nouns ending in an s, you can add either ‘s or an apostrophe alone:

the witness’s lie or the witness’ lie (be consistent)

Commas in a list

Used between a list of three or more words to replace the word and for all but the last instance.

 

Jenny’s favourite subjects are maths, literacy and art.

Joe, Evan and Mike were chosen to sing at the service.

The giant had a large head, hairy ears and two big, beady eyes.

Commas to mark phrases or clauses

 

To indicate contrast: The snake was brown, not green, and it was quite small.

Where the phrase (embedded clause) could be in brackets: The recipe, which we hadn’t tried before, is very easy to follow.

Where the phrase adds relevant information: Mr Hardy, aged 68, ran his first marathon five years ago.

To mark a subordinate clause: If at first you don’t succeed, try again. Though the snake was small, I still feared for my life.

Introductory or opening phrases: In general, sixty-eight is quite old to run a marathon. On the whole, snakes only attack when riled.

Conjunctive verbs: Unfortunately, the bear was already in a bad mood and, furthermore, pink wasn’t its colour.

Brackets (also known as parentheses)

Used for additional information or explanation.

To clarify information:

Jamie’s bike was red (bright red) with a yellow stripe.

For asides and comments:

The bear was pink (I kid you not).

To give extra details:

His first book (The Colour Of Magic) was written in 1989.

Ellipsis

Used to indicate a pause in speech or at the very end of a sentence so that words trail off into silence (this helps to create suspense).

A pause in speech:

“The sight was awesome… truly amazing.”

At end of a sentence to create suspense:

Mr Daily gritted his teeth, gripped the scalpel tightly in his right hand and slowly advanced…

Dash

Used to show interruption (often in dialogue) or to show repetition.

To show interruption:

“The girl is my – “

“Sister,” interrupted Miles, “She looks just like you.”

To show repetition:

“You-you monster!” cried the frightened woman.

“St-st-stop!” stammered the boy.

Colons

  1. Used before a list, summary or quote
  2. Used to complete a statement of fact
Before a list: I could only find three of the ingredients: sugar, flour and coconut.

Before a summary: To summarise: we found the camp, set up our tent and then the bears attacked.

Before a line of speech: Tom asked: “May I have another cupcake?”

Before a statement of fact: There are only three kinds of people: the good, the bad and the ugly.

Semi-colons

Used in place of a connective (conjunction). Shows thoughts on either side of it are balanced and connected. It can also separate words or items within a list.

To link two separate sentences that are closely related:

The children came home today; they had been away for a week.

In a list:

Star Trek, created by Gene Roddenberry; Babylon 5, by JMS; Buffy, by Joss Whedon; and Farscape, from the Henson Company.

Text Type Chart

Spelling

Year 1 Spelling And Word Level Work

Revision of Reception WorkIt is important to re-visit these objectives early in the Autumn term and ensure that they are secure. Any children that have not achieved these objectives must continue to work on them in small, focused support groups during the phonics session. Any generic issues across the ability range e.g. alphabetical order must be planned for until achieved. Children who have already achieved the objectives should move on to the Year 1 objectives immediately. Al objectives must be taught with high levels of pupil participation and in a variety of ways e.g. use of ICT, whiteboards (show me) alongside looks, cover, wrote, spell strategies.
Plan opportunities to practise and secure the ability to rhyme and relate this to spelling patterns/stories.
Knowledge of phoneme/grapheme correspondence by: hearing and identifying initial and final sounds in words; reading letters that represent the sounds: a-z, ch, sh, th; writing each letter in response to each sound: a-z, ch, sh, th. Segment all three phonemes to spell CVC words and blend all 3 graphemes to read CVC words.
Alphabetic letter names and alphabetic order must be secure.
Read on sight a range of familiar words, e.g. children’s names, captions, labels and words from favourite books.
Read on sight and spell the 45 reception high frequency words.

 

 

Year 1 Continuous Objectives

These objectives should be taught and re-visited regularly throughout the year. Children should be assessed regularly against these objectives and the results recorded with next steps identified.

Rules and GuidanceExample Words
Read and spell 90 of the Y1 and Y2 high frequency words.
Blend phonemes in words for reading and segment phonemes in words for spelling.
Learn the terms ‘vowel’ and ‘consonant’
Reading and spelling of Consonant-Vowel-Consonant (cvc) wordsbad, leg, hop, red, run, yes, van, zip, wet, jam, kit, cup, lid, fox, quiz (fox and quiz are not phonologically cvc but are included for the sake of covering all letters of the alphabet).
Reading and spelling of CCVC words

Reading and spelling of CVCC words

Reading and spelling of CCVCC words

flat, step, drip, frog, plum

sand, help, lost, jump, wind

grand, crept, print, frost, blunt

Year 1 Spelling WorkRules and GuidanceExample Words
Words with consonant digraphsship, fish, chips, much, thin, this, ring
Read and spell words with vowel digraphs and trigraphs (RWI phonic programme to support)

ai

ay

a_e

e_e

ee

ea

ow

oa

o_e

oo

u_e / ue

ew

igh

i_e

oi

oy

ar

er

ir

ur

ou

ow(ou)

or

ore

oor

aw

au

air

eer

ear

ire

Some should already be known from Rec.

 

‘ai’ is never used at the end of English words.

‘ay’ used for the sounds at the end of words and at the end of syllables.

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘oa’ very rarely used at the end of a word.

 

 

‘ue’ is more commonly used at the end of words than ‘oo’.

‘ew’ is more commonly used at the end of words than ‘oo’.

 

 

‘oi’ is never used at the end of English words.

‘oy’ is used for those sounds at the end of words and syllables.

 

rain, sail, train, paid, snail

day, play, say, way, Sunday

 

made, came, same, take, late

these, theme

see, tree, green, meet, week

leaf, sea, dream, meat, read

blow, snow, grow, slow, show

boat, coat, road, soap

home, those, note, bone, hole

food, cool, moon, zoo, spoon

June, rule, rude, use, cube, tune, blue, clue, rescue

new, few, grew, chew, drew, threw

high, night, light, bright, right

kite, bite, like, time, slide, bike

oil, boil, join, coin

boy, toy, annoy, enjoy

car, star, park, arm, garden

her, term, verb, butter, letter, summer

girl, bird, shirt, skirt

turn, burn, curl, hurt

out, about, cloud, round, sound

now, how, cow, down, town

for, fork, born, horse

more, sore, before, wore

floor, door, poor

saw, draw, yawn, crawl

author, August, dinosaur, astronaut

air, fair, stairs, pair, chair

deer, peer, cheer

hear, fear, dear,

fire, hire, wire, admire

Read and spell words ending in: ff, ll, ss, ck, ngoff, all, fell, kiss, kick, thing
Words ending in –y (/ee/ or /i/ depending on accent)very, happy, sorry, carry, party
Investigate and learn spellings of words with ‘s’ for pluralcats, dogs, colours, balls
To investigate and learn spellings of verbs with ‘-ed’ (past tense) and –ing (present tense)walked, talked, sobbed, shouted

walking, talking, sobbing, shouting

Adding the prefix ‘un’This is added to the beginning of a word without any change to the spelling of the root word.unhappy, undo, unload, unfair, unlock
Common exception wordsthe, do, to, said, says, are, were, was, I, you, your, they, be, he, me, she, we, no, go, so, by, my, there, love, come, some, one, once etc…..

Year 2 Spelling And Word Level Work

Revision of Year 1 WorkIt is important to re-visit these objectives early in the Autumn term and ensure that they are secure. Any children that have not achieved these objectives must continue to work on them in small, focused support groups during the phonics session. Any generic issues across the ability range e.g, plurals must be planned for until achieved. Children who have already achieved the objectives should move on to the Year 1 objectives immediately. Al objectives must be taught with high levels of pupil participation and in a variety of ways e.g. use of ICT, whiteboards (show me) alongside looks, cover, wrote, spell strategies.
Revise and extend the reading and spelling of words containing the long vowel phonemes.
Blend phonemes in words for reading and segment phonemes in words for spelling.
Use word endings, e.g. ‘s’ plural, ‘ed’ past tense and ‘ing’ present tense and prefixes e.g.’un’, ‘dis’, to support reading and spelling.
Secure understanding and use of the terms ‘vowel’ and consonant’.

 

Year 2 Continuous Objectives

These objectives should be taught and re-visited regularly throughout the year. Children should be assessed regularly against these objectives and the results recorded with next steps identified.

Rules and GuidanceExample Words
To read on sight and spell all of the Year 1 and 2 high frequency words.
To discriminate, orally, syllables in multi-syllabic words.
To organise words in to alphabetical order using the first two letters.
Discuss difference in meaning and with spelling of ‘antonyms’
To use synonyms and other alternative words/phrases that express the same or similar meanings. Use to enhance writing.
Compound wordsCompound words are two words joined together. Each part of the longer word is spelt as it would be if it were on its own.football, laptop, playground, farmyard, bedroom, blackberry
Simple contractionsIn contractions the apostrophe shows where a letter or letters would be if the words were written in full.

NOTE: ‘It’s = it is’. The apostrophe is never used for the possessive.

can’t, didn’t, hasn’t, couldn’t, it’s, who’s, I’ve
Homophonesthere/their/they’re

here/hear

quite/quiet

see/sea

bare/bear

one/won

to/too/two

be/bee

blue/blew

cheap/cheep

night/knight

Common exception wordsGreat, break, find, kind, behind, find, wild, most, every, laugh, aunt, autumn, pretty, beautiful, hour, shoes, buy, sure, eye, climb, thumb, castle, listen, could, should, would etc…
Year 2 Spelling WorkRules and GuidanceExample Words
Vowel phoneme ‘oo’ as in /u/good, hood, book, wood, foot
Vowel phoneme ‘ea’ as in /e/head, bread, ready, instead, read
Vowel phoneme ‘ie’ as in /igh/ and /ee/lie, pie, cried, tried, fried

chief, field, thief

Consonant spellings ‘ph’ ‘ch’ and ‘wh’The /f/ sound is not usually spelt as ‘ph’ in everyday words e.g. fat, fill, fun.dolphin, alphabet, phonics, photographs, elephant

Christmas, choir, Christopher

when, where, which, wheel, whisk

Using ‘k’ for /k/ soundThe /k/ sound is spelt as ‘k’ rather than as c before e, i and yKent, kit, skip, husky, sketch, skeleton
The /j/ sound spelt as ‘-ge’ and ‘-dge’ at the end of words, and sometimes spelt as ‘g’ elsewhere in words before e, i and y.The letter ‘j’ is never used for the /j/ sound at the end of English words. At the end of a word, the /j/ sound is spelt ‘-dge’ straight after the /a/, /e/, /i/, /o/, /u/ sounds (short vowels).

After all other sounds, whether vowels or consonants, the /j/ sound is spelt as ‘-ge’ at the end of a word.

In other positions in words, the /j/ sound is often (but not always) spelt as ‘g’ before e, i and y. The /j/ sound is always spelt as ‘j’ before a, o and u.

badge, ledge, bridge, dodge, fudge

 

 

age, huge, orange, charge, bulge, village

 

gem, giant, ginger, giraffe, energy

The /s/ sound spelt ‘c’ before e, i and yrace, prince, cell, city, fancy
The /n/ sound spelt kn- and (less commonly) gn- at the beginning of words.The ‘k’ and ‘g’ at the beginning of these words was sounded hundreds of years ago.knot, know, knee, knife, gnaw, gnome
Spell words with common suffixes, e.g. ‘-ful,’ ‘-ly’The –ly’ suffix is added to an adjective to form a verb. It starts with a consonant so is added straight on to most words unless they end in y. If a root word ends in y, the y is changed to i.careful, helpful

carefully, anxiously, sadly

happily, angrily

The /igh/ sound spelt ‘-y’ at the end of words.This is by far the most common spelling for this sound at the end of words.cry, try, reply, July, fly, fry
Adding ‘-es’ to nouns and verbs ending in consonant + yThe ‘y’ is changed to ‘i’ before ‘-es’ is added.Cries, flies, replies, copies, babies, carries
Adding ‘-ed’ and ‘-ing’ to root words ending in consonant +yThe ‘y’ is changed to ‘i’ before ‘-ed’ is added, but not before ‘-ing’ as this would result in ‘ii’copied, cried, copying, crying
Adding ‘-ing’ and ‘-ed’ to words ending in vowel+ consonant+ eThe ‘e’ at the end of the root word is dropped before adding

‘-ing’ and ‘-ed’

hiking, hiked,
The /aw/ sound spelt ‘a’ before ‘l’ and ‘ll’The /aw/ sound is usually spelt as ‘a’ before ‘l’ or ‘ll’ball, all, call, walk, talk, always
The /u/ sound spelt ‘o’other, monkey, brother, nothing, Monday, wonder
The /ee/ sound spelt –ey’The plural of these words is formed by the addition od ‘-s’Key, monkey, donkey, chimney, honey
The /ur/ and /aw/ sound spelt after ‘w’There are very few of these wordsword, work, worm, world

Year 3 Spelling And Word Level Work

Revision of Year 2 WorkIt is important to re-visit these objectives early in the Autumn term and ensure that they are secure. Any children that have not achieved these objectives must continue to work on them in small, focused support groups during the phonics session. Any generic issues across the ability range e.g, plurals must be planned for until achieved. Children who have already achieved the objectives should move on to the Year 1 objectives immediately. Al objectives must be taught with high levels of pupil participation and in a variety of ways e.g. use of ICT, whiteboards (show me) alongside looks, cover, wrote, spell strategies.
The spelling of words containing each of the long vowel phonemes from Year 1 and Year 2
To read on sight and spell all of the Year 1 and 2 high frequency words
To blend phonemes for reading and segment for spelling
To discriminate, orally, syllables in multi-syllabic words
Discuss difference in meaning and with spelling of ‘antonyms’
To use synonyms and other alternative words/phrases that express the same or similar meanings. Use to enhance writing.
Organise words into alphabetical order using the next letters when appropriate
Revise and extend work on adding suffixes: ‘ful’, ‘ly’, ‘es’,  ‘ed’ and  ‘ing’
Revise all irregular spelling patterns from Year 2
Revise work on contractions
Revise work on common homophones

 

Year 3 Continuous Objectives

These objectives should be taught and re-visited regularly throughout the year. Children should be assessed regularly against these objectives and the results recorded with next steps identified.

Rules and GuidanceExample Words
To read and spell most words from set 3 of the high frequency words list.
To identify mis-spelt words in own writing and keep an individual list/log and learn to spell them
To use independent spelling strategies, including: sounding out, visual skills, building from other words, by analogy, using word banks and dictionaries
To infer the meaning of unknown words from context.
To have a secure understanding of the purpose and organisation of a dictionary. Know the quartiles of the dictionary e.g. ‘m’ lies around the half way mark.
To understand the purpose and organisation of the thesaurus, and use it to find synonym of high frequency words e.g. said, big, nasty. Use the term ‘synonym’.
Year 3 Spelling WorkRules and GuidanceExample Words
Soft ‘c’Usually used instead of ‘s’ before a, y, I, e.certain, city, bicycle, space
Soft ‘g’The sound /j/ is written ‘g’ when it is followed by ‘e’ and ‘i’.gentle, danger, tragic
/k/ spelt ‘ch’school, choir, chorus, character, orchid
Words with /s/ sound spelt ‘sc’The Romans probably pronounced the ‘sc’ in the Latin words from which these words come as /sk/. Mentally pronouncing these words that way may help with spelling. E.g. the pronunciation /skene/ can be used when learning to spell ‘scene’.science, scene, muscle, scissors
‘tion’ , ‘cian’ and ‘sion’station, fiction, national, section

magician, musician

television, tension, discussion, explosion

‘ent’ and ‘ant’When spoken, ‘ent’ and ‘ant’ are often crushed into ‘unt’parent, ancient, absent

servant, giant, elegant

‘ous’, ‘cious’ and ‘tious’enormous, gorgeous

delicious, precious

cautious, ambitious

The /l/ sound spelt ‘-le’ at the end of words‘-le’ is the most common spelling for this sound at the end of words.table, apple, handle, bottle, tickle, middle
The /l/ sound spelt ‘-el’ at the end of wordsMuch less common than ‘-le’. Used after: m, n, r, s, v, w.camel, tunnel, squirrel, tinsel, travel, towel
The /l/ sound spelt ‘-al’ at the end of wordsNot many nouns end in ‘-al’ but adjectives do.pedal, metal, capital, hospital, animal, tropical
The /l/ sound spelt ‘-il’ at the end of wordsThere are not many of these words.pencil, fossil, nostril
The /zh/ sound spelt ‘s’television, treasure, usual
The /i/ sound spelt ‘y’ elsewhere than at the end of wordsThese words should be learnt as neededmyth, gym, Egypt, pyramid, mystery
The /u/ sound spelt ‘ou’young, cousin, double, trouble, couple, country
The /o/ sound spelt ‘a’ after w and qu‘a’ is the most common spelling for /o/ after w and quWant, wash, wander, watch, quantity, squash
The possessive apostrophe for singular nounsMegan’s book…..

The girl’s lunchbox….

Plurals (use the terms ‘singular’ and ‘plural’ appropriately)When a word ends in ‘f’ we change it to ‘v’ and add ‘es’

When words end in ‘o’ we add ‘es’

When words end in ‘y’ we change it to ‘I’ and add ‘es’

Some words do not change even if there is more than one

loaf – loaves, leaf – leaves, shelf – shelves

potato – potatoes

lady – ladies, baby – babies

sheep, fish, deer

More prefixes – use the term ‘prefix’Prefixes are added to the beginning of root words without any changes in spelling.

‘un’, ‘dis’ and ‘mis’ have negative meanings.

‘in’ can mean not.

Before a root word starting with l, ‘in’ becomes ‘il-‘

Before a root word starting with m or p, ‘in’ becomes ‘im-‘

Before a root word starting with r, ‘in’ becomes ‘ir’

‘re’ means again or back.

‘sub’ means under

‘inter’ means between or among

‘super’ means above

‘anti-‘ means against

‘auto’ means self or own

A range of others to be taught.

disappear, misbehave, unnatural

incorrect

illegal

impossible

irreplaceable

redo

subheading

interact

supermarket

anti-clockwise

automatic

Adding the suffixes ‘er’ and ‘est’ to words ending in consonant + yThe y is changed to ‘i’ before ‘er’ and ‘est’ are addedhappier, happiest
Adding the suffixes ‘er’ ‘y’ and ‘est’ to words ending in consonant + eThe e at the end of the root word is dropped. Any other suffix beginning with a vowel is added.nicer, nicest, shiny
The suffixes ‘ment’, ‘ness’, ‘ful’ and ‘less’

 

Use knowledge of suffixes to generate new words from root words

If a suffix starts with a consonant it is added straight on to most root words without any change.

Exceptions – argument

enjoyment, sadness, joyful, playful, hopeless
Understand and use short vowel doubling when adding some suffixes.grinning, hugging, beginning

spinner, planner

travelled, clapped

To investigate, spell and read words with silent lettersknee, gnat, wrinkle
Recognise and generate more compound words.Compound words are two words joined together. Each part of the longer word is spelt as it would be if it were on its own.shoelace, underneath, playground
To explore homonyms.These have the same spelling but multiple meanings.wave, form

Year 4 Spelling And Word Level Work

Revision of Year 3 WorkIt is important to re-visit these objectives early in the Autumn term and ensure that they are secure. Any children that have not achieved these objectives must continue to work on them in small, focused support groups during the phonics session. Any generic issues across the ability range e.g, plurals must be planned for until achieved. Children who have already achieved the objectives should move on to the Year 1 objectives immediately. Al objectives must be taught with high levels of pupil participation and in a variety of ways e.g. use of ICT, whiteboards (show me) alongside looks, cover, wrote, spell strategies.
To identify mis-spelt words in own writing and keep an individual list/log and learn to spell them
To use independent spelling strategies, including: sounding out, visual skills, building from other words, by analogy, using word banks and dictionaries
To infer the meaning of unknown words from context.
To have a secure understanding of the purpose and organisation of a dictionary. Know the quartiles of the dictionary e.g. ‘m’ lies around the half way mark.
To understand the purpose and organisation of the thesaurus, and use it to find synonym of high frequency words e.g. said, big, nasty. Use the term ‘synonym’.
Revise all spelling work from Year 3, including: plurals, prefixes and suffixes.
Revise the use of the possessive apostrophe for singular nouns and the apostrophe for contractions.
Revise and extend work on silent letters.
Revise and extend work on homonyms.
Revise and extend work on homophones.

 

Year 4 Continuous Objectives

These objectives should be taught and re-visited regularly throughout the year. Children should be assessed regularly against these objectives and the results recorded with next steps identified.

Rules and GuidanceExample Words
Spell two syllable words containing double consonants.bubble, kettle, common
Irregular tense changesgo/went

can/could

Use 3rd or 4th place letters to locate and sequence words in alphabetical order.
To understand the use of an apostrophe in singular and plural words to show possession.The girl’s hat blew off her head.

The girls’ hats blew off their head.

Words to learnaccident, advertise, approve, benefit, behave, bicycle, breath, breathe, building, calendar, certain, concentrate, chocolate, congratulate, conscience, continue, decorate, describe, dictionary, difficult, discover, disturb, early, earn, earth, educate, excite, experience, experiment, explore, extreme, February, grammar, guide, guard, half, heart, immediate, improve, increase, independent, injure, inquire, interest, island, junior, knowledge, library, material, medicine, mention, multiply, murmur, nephew, occasion, often, opposite, paragraph, particular, peculiar, position, possess, produce, professor, promise, property, prove, punctuate, quality, quantity, quarrel, quarter, recite, recover, register, regular, reign, remember, sentence, separate, sew, situate, strength, sufficient, sure, surprise, surround, thought, through, though, weary
Year 4 Spelling WorkRules and GuidanceExample Words
/sh/ spelt ‘ch’chef, machine, brochure,
Word endings ‘ance’, ‘ence’circumstance, importance

absence, dependence

Word endings ‘ure’, ‘our’picture, failure

behaviour, colour

Word endings ‘ible’, ‘ibly’, ‘able’,

‘ably’

horrible, horribly

comfortable, comfortably

Suffixes – ‘-ful’, ‘-fully’When the suffix ‘-ful’ is added to a root word, it makes an adjective.

When the suffix ‘-fully’ is added to a root word, it makes it an adverb.

careful, cheerful, purposeful

thankfully, hopefully

Extend work on ‘ph’ /f/paragraph, photograph, orphan
/k/ ‘que’ & /g/ ‘gue’unique, cheque, picturesque

catalogue, tongue, colleague

Extended work on suffixes-al

-ary

-ic

-ship

-hood

-ness

-ment

-en

-er

Extended work on prefixesCom-

Con-

Dis-

Ex-

Pre-

Pro-

Re-

Changing nouns and adjectives and verbs by use of suffixes e.g. ‘-ate’, ‘-ify’, ‘-able’, ‘-ful’, ‘-ing’etc..solid – solidify

wash – washable

hope – hopeful

Explore the implications of words which imply gender, including the suffix’ –ess’fox/vixen

Prince/Princess

King/Queen

To explore words with common letter strings but different pronunciations.tough, through, plough

hour, journey

Year 5 And 6 Spelling And Word Level Work

Revision of Year 4 WorkIt is important to re-visit these objectives early in the Autumn term and ensure that they are secure. Any children that have not achieved these objectives must continue to work on them in small, focused support groups during the phonics session. Any generic issues across the ability range e.g, plurals must be planned for until achieved. Children who have already achieved the objectives should move on to the Year 1 objectives immediately. All objectives must be taught with high levels of pupil participation and in a variety of ways e.g. use of ICT, whiteboards (show me) alongside look, cover, write, spell strategies.
/sh/ spelt ‘ch’
Word endings ‘ance’, ‘ence’
Word endings ‘ure’, ‘our’
Word endings ‘ible’, ‘ibly’, ‘able’,

‘ably’

Suffixes – ‘-ful’, ‘-fully’
Extend work on ‘ph’ /f/
/k/ ‘que’ & /g/ ‘gue’
Extended work on suffixes
Extended work on prefixes
Changing nouns and adjectives and verbs by use of suffixes e.g. ‘-ate’, ‘-ify’, ‘-able’, ‘-ful’, ‘-ing’etc..
Explore the implications of words which imply gender, including the suffix’ –ess’
To explore words with common letter strings but different pronunciations.
Revise work on silent letters.

 

Year 5/6 Continuous Objectives

These objectives should be taught and re-visited regularly throughout the year. Children should be assessed regularly against these objectives and the results recorded with next steps identified.

Rules and GuidanceExample Words
Identify mis-spelt words in own writing; to keep individual lists (e.g. spelling logs) to learn to spell them.
To use known spellings as a basis for spelling other words.
Use independent spelling strategies, including:

·         Building up spellings by syllabic parts using known prefixes, suffixes and common letter strings.

·         Applying knowledge of spelling rules and exceptions.

·         Building words from other known words and from awareness of the meaning or derivation of words.

·         Using dictionaries and IT spell checks.

·         Using visual skills e.g. recognising common letter strings and checking critical features (i.e. does it look right, shape,length etc..)

Year 5/6 Word Level/ Spelling WorkRules and GuidanceExample Words
Investigate and learn the spelling patterns in pluralisation and construct rules for regular spellings.Add –s to most words.

Add –es to words ending in -x –s, -sh, ch.

When a word ends in –f, change the –f  to ‘ves’.

When –y is at the end of a word and is preceded by a consonant change the –y to –ies.

When –y is at the end of a word and is preceded by a vowel add –s.

NB – Teach the irregular plurals.

telephone – telephones

box – boxes

leaf – leaves

baby – babies

toy – toys

foot – feet   sheep – sheep

Collect and investigate the meaning of spellings of words using the following prefixes: auto, bi, trans, tele, circum.automobile, bicycle, transform, television, circumference

 

Explain the difference between synonyms.Identify the shades of meaning.angry, irritated, frustrated, upset…..
Identify root words, derivations and spelling patterns in order to extend vocabulary and provide support for spelling.sign, signature, signal

bomb, bombard

Collect and classify a range of idiomatic phrases, clichés and expressions.under the weather

not up to it

put a brave face on

Use adverbs to qualify verbs when writing dialogue, using a thesaurus to extend vocabulary.timidly, gruffly, excitedly
To further investigate antonyms.Discus why some words have opposites.

Discuss why others have more than one opposite.

Discuss why some have none.

(Link to children’s knowledge of adjectives and adverbs).

near, over, white

big, right

green, wall

To identify everyday words such as, spaghetti, bungalow and boutique, which have been borrowed from other languages, and to understand how this might give clues to spelling.
To understand how words can be formed from longer words.Through omission of letters – o’clock, (tele) phone, (aero) plane, through use of acronyms e.g. CD
To explore onomatopoeia.Collect and use words whose meaning is in their sounds.splash, plop, band, crash, smack, trickle, swoop.
The correct use and spelling of possessive pronouns.Should be closely linked to work on grammar.their, theirs

your, yours

my, mine

Endings which sound like /shus/ spelt – cious or  tious.Not many common words end like this.

If the root word ends in –ce, the /sh/ is spelt as ‘c’ e.g.vice – vicious, grace – gracious, space, spacious.

Exception – anxious.

vicious, precious, delicious, suspicious

ambitious, cautious, fictitious, infectious, nutritious

Endings which sound like /shul/ spelt ‘cial’ or ‘tial’.-cial is common after avowel and –tial after a consonant, but there are some exceptions.

Exceptions: initial, financial, commercial, provincial (though the spelling of the last three could be said to come from finance, commerce and province.

official, special, artificial

partial, confidential, essential

Words ending in –ant, -ance/ – ancy, -ent,

-ence/-ency.

Use –ant and –ance/-ancy if there is a related word and with a clear /a/ or /ai/ sound in the right position. (-ation endings are often a clue).

Use –ent and –ence/-ency after soft ‘c’ (/s/ sound), soft ‘g’ (/j/ sound) and ‘qu’, or if there is a related word with a clear /e/ sound in the right position.

observant, observance (observation), expectant (expectation), hesitant, hesitancy (hesitation), tolerant, tolerance (toleration), substance (substantial)

innocent, innocence, decent, decency, frequent, frequency, confident, confidence (confidential), assistant, assistance, obedient, obedience, independent, independence

Words ending in –ible and –able.The –able ending is far more common than the

-ible ending.

As with –ant and –ance/-ancy, the –able ending is used if there is related word ending in –ation.

If the –able ending is added to a word ending in

–ce or –ge, the ‘e’ after those letters must be kept as those letters would otherwise have their ‘hard’ sounds (as in cap and gap) before the ‘a’ of the –able ending.

The –able ending is usually but not always used if a complete root word can be heard before it, even if there is no related work ending in –ation. The first six examples opposite are obvious; in reliable, the word rely is heard, but the ‘y’ changes to ‘i’ in accordance with the rule.

The –ible ending is common if a complete root word can’t be heard before it but it also sometimes occurs when a complete word can be heard e.g. sensible.

adorable (adoration), applicable (application), considerable (consideration), tolerable (toleration)

changeable, noticeable, forcible, legible

dependable, comfortable, understandable, reasonable, enjoyable, reliable

 

possible, horrible, terrible, visible, incredible, sensible

Adding suffixes beginning with vowels to words ending in –fer.The ‘r’ is  doubled if the ‘fer is still stressed when the ending is added.

The r is not doubled if the –fer is no longer stressed.

referring, referred, referral, preferring, preferred, transferring, transferred

reference, referee, , preference, transference

Use of the hyphen to link words.Hyphens can be used to join a prefix to a root word, especially is the prefix ends in a vowel and the root word also begins with one.co-ordinate, re-iterate, pre-eminent, co-own
Words with the /ee/ sound spelt ‘ei’ after ‘c’.The ‘i before e except after c’ rule applies to words where the sound spelt by ‘ei’  is a clear /ee/.

Exceptions: protein, caffeine, seize

deceive, conceive, receive, perceive, ceiling
Words containing the letter string ‘ough’‘ough’ is one of the trickiest spellings in English – it can be used to spell a number of different sounds.ought, bought, thought, nought

rough, tough, enough, cough

though, although, dough

through

thorough, borough

plough

Words with ‘silent’ letters (i.e. letters which cannot be predicted from the pronunciation of the word)Some letters which are no longer sounded used to be sounded hundreds of years ago: e.g. in knight, the ‘k’ was sounded as /k/ and the ‘gh’ used to represent the sound the sound that ‘ch’ now represents in the Scottish word loch.doubt, island, solemn, thistle, knight
Explore spelling patterns of consonants and formulate rulesll in full becomes ‘l’ when used as a suffix.

words ending with a single consonant preceded by a short vowel, double the consonant before adding –ing, -ed, -er etc… e.g. hummed, sitting, wetter

Investigate, collect and classify spelling patterns in pluralisation, construct rules for regular spellings.-s is added to most words

Add –es to words ending in –s, -sh, ch

Change –f to –ves

When –y is preceded by a consonant change to –ies

When –y is preceded by a vowel, add –s

bottles

foxes

leaves

babies

 

donkeys

Soft cC is usually soft when followed by i.circus, accident
Homophones and other words that are often confusedIn these pairs of words, nouns end –ce and verbs end –se. Advice and advise provide a useful clue as the word advise (verb) is pronounced with a /z/ sound – which could not be spelt c.

 

aisle – isle

aloud – allowed

affect – effect

altar – alter

ascent – assent

bridal – bridle

cereal – serial

compliment – complement

descent – dissent

desert – dessert

disinterested – uninterested

draft – drought

eligible – illegible

eliminate – illuminate

farther – father

guessed – guest

heard – herd

led – lead

morning – mourning

past – passed

precede – proceed

principal – principle

profit – prophet

stationary – stationery

steal – steel

wary – weary

who’s – whose

Year Phonics Screening Check

Last Updated On April 25, 2019